Medicine From The Trenches

Experiences from undergradute, graduate school, medical school, residency and beyond.

Using Every Tool

As all of us in academics (professors, students) enter the final stages before the semester/quarter ends, we make the push to finish strong. If you have been struggling with your studies, now is the time, just like tax time, to get your work shored up for that strong finish. It also a good time to take and inventory of sorts, in your thinking about why and how you master your studies to have the best outcome in your classes.

We finished our spring breaks with the hope of resting perhaps getting away from our studies in order to come back with renewed energy. Depending on how you spend your break-some catching up, some getting away, some planning for the next steps, you may be feeling that the “break” was not a break at all. If that was the case, then take this weekend to put some strategies into place to finish this term/semester/school year as best you can.

I always advise my students at the beginning of the year, that regular planning/study is the key to mastery of your subject matter. Making schedules and sticking to them is as important to success as my daily workouts are key to my training for an upcoming marathon. I have to work out regularly in order to complete my distance race. I can’t arrive on race day and run a marathon, half-marathon or even a 10-kilometer race without doing some daily training/conditioning work.

Like anything that I have to train for, there are days when I don’t feel like putting in the time. Sometimes, I just want to take a break but I can’t take too many breaks. My training runs, like your daily study periods are a time to work on those little details to develop the strength and tools to complete my goals. If I don’t put in that time regularly (do something) I won’t be ready for my long-distance race.

Sometimes, I do take a very short break from my training but at the end of the day, my tool is that I do something more intense so that I get a small benefit of even not running on that particular break day. These are my mini-spring breaks away from training. This strategy, I apply to studies (yes, even as a professor, I am constantly learning, honing and refining). That short break is the tool to remind me to get back onto my regular schedule as soon as possible.

I have used preparation for a long distance race because when I made the change from short-distance running to long-distance running, many other items in my life became easier and better. My studies, like your studies whether you are an undergraduate, graduate or medical student require daily work and refinement; in other words, daily training. We are all preparing and using the tools of preparation for finishing strong in our endeavors.

Consistent work is always key to academic success. In today’s world of electronic delivery of materials, one still has to devote regular study time for complete mastery of subject matter. We have millions of bits of information at our fingertips, online and even on our thumb drives, that we must master for our programs of study. Organization and regular consistent study of our academic materials is more relevant today than back when I was in medical school and graduate school.

Organize your materials, plan your study schedule and take short breaks over the course of the day but be consistent in your study. As I have written in other pieces on this blog, my tools of organization have been to review the previous material, study the present material and prepare for what will come next. These are your tools for making sure that this period before finals and before the semester/year ends are in place so that you may finish strong.

Just as I want to complete my upcoming distance race as strong as possible, I want to complete the race. Use your time wisely, take short breaks away from your studies but make those breaks matter. Don’t give up at this point because you are overwhelmed. When those feelings of being overwhelmed enter your mind, take a short minute, jot down that you are feeling overwhelmed and write out only the next small thing that you will complete.

As you complete many small things, they always add up to completion of the big items. Completing those small items also keeps procrastination from derailing your studies at this time. Until you have taken that final exam, nothing is lost and you can keep preparing but if you stop, give up and allow feelings of “everyone is doing the better that I am” to enter your strategies, you won’t be see any success. Fight the feelings to make comparison to those around you; only compare you with you yesterday.

You can’t change the passage of time and you can’t change the past but you can decide in the next minute to change your thinking about how you deal with the present to affect the future. This is the most valuable tool for anything. I can’t change how I ran my last race but I can keep preparing for the one that is coming up. This is what I tell myself as I head out the door to the gym to do a bit of speed work and lift some weights. Every weight I life, every step I take is moving forward. Use those tools and adapt as you make adjustments to finish strong but don’t forget a tiny break/ reward for keeping things going.

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14 April, 2018 Posted by | academics, medical school | , | Leave a comment

In Service, In Reality

2017-07-07 10.56.37

I found out a short time ago, that I am a match for donating a kidney to a colleague. The reality of my choice has been weighing on my mind as I perform my early morning runs through my little mid-western suburban town. I will donate one of my kidneys to help a colleague who is suffering on hemodialysis with many complications. It turns out that his son is also a match but refuses to donate to his father. I can’t refuse being of service to those who need something I can provide.

I did not make this choice lightly, to donate one of my kidneys. I am in robust good health, taking no medications as I run 6-8 miles each morning in the very early morning darkness. At my age, I am something of an anomaly with defying the odds; continuing to challenge myself physically and mentally. At a time when most of my colleagues contemplate retirement, I contemplate my next adventure be it sailing an ocean, flying cross country or running a marathon. In short, physical and mental challenges enrich my life and will continue to enrich my life.

I would be less than honest if I didn’t say that the timing of this transplant is worrisome for me. Minimally, I will be away from my running and teaching for a few weeks. Runners always worry about losing conditioning if we are not out crossing pavement but I can do other things such as swimming (need to work on my strokes) and biking as I recover. I plan another shot at the marathon distance in the late spring thus I know that this surgery will challenge my training for that run. This recovery will be problematic for me who strives on being as independent as possible.

My service to others is something that is part of me. I grew up in a family of physicians who always pushed me to give as much as I can. We were fortunate to have the advantages of good education and great guidance from our parents and extended family. “To those that much has been given, much is expected,” was ingrained in me as early as I can remember; much of why I chose medicine/surgery as a career. My service to other has recently extended to my study for the priesthood too. I have an opportunity to give a gift that will enable another human to live a high quality life.

While I intellectually understand the physical implications of my choice to donate an organ, I face the mental challenges of this donation with much trepidation. My feelings are not of “what if I need it later” but how can I minimize not being available for my students and patients at this time of the year. We are in the midst of epidemics and the start of a second semester which always bring challenges to those of us in academic medicine. I also didn’t have the wonderful luxury of input from those whose opinions I value most, my touchstones as both are busy with academic duties and so forth.

As I see my students, some now quite comfortable with their clinical duties and some who have made the adjustment to the rigors of the first-year curriculum, I am concerned that my brief absence from teaching may make an impact. Still, my duty to service forces me to recover as fast as possible and be present to guide those who are training under me. These are the thoughts that occupy my meditations on my distance runs these days.

In a time when many are quite self-absorbed, it is my duty as a human being and as a physician to help those who are in the direst of need.  Does that duty to help extend to organ donation? In my mind, it does extend to giving as much as I can for the good of another human being. The last thing that I consider is the effect on me physically as this will be minimal in the long-term scheme of my fortunate life.

My mentor for the priesthood suggested that I speak with the son of my colleague who because of choices made by the father, refuses to donate an organ. My mentor says that my best service extends to make another attempt to heal this family spiritually too. There is much merit to my priest mentor’s input here as there is still a small window of time but a challenge for this fledgling student of theology. In reality, I see many facets to this challenge which I meet as I meet all of my challenges.

My colleague is in need; his family needs him and I am honored to serve both this man and his family. He has much to live for and many depend on him.  In short, his life is very valuable to those who love him. It is those relationships of love and connection that must be preserved as long as possible. I am dedicated to organ donation both living and after death. Organ donation is one more aspect of my life of service to others. My reality is that through my service to others, my life has value and that my value is only through my service. I live a rich life of serenity that is a great gift given to me. I do this because I can do this and will do no less.

31 January, 2018 Posted by | life in medicine | , , | Leave a comment

Challenges to Come in Medicine

As everyone takes a much-needed holiday break, it would be good to look at some of the challenges ahead, the greatest of which is adequate delivery of health services to all of our patients. We continue to hear that the wealthy have adequate access but numbers those who are in the world of adequate access  to good health care are getting smaller. Even two years ago, the solid middle-class had tools available for access to health care but those tools are getting scarce. This scarcity of health care resources will increase largely from increased costs for everyone. The wealthy will weather these changes but more and more of our patients will not.

What do these changes mean for us who are charged by profession, to deliver adequate health care? These changes mean that we must take valuable and scarce time to study the political consequences of closing clinics, increased cost of insurance premiums and the disappearance of the mandate for having health insurance. Mandates are only a tool but they were decreasing the numbers of the uninsured in this country. More patients who are uninsured has always translated into increased costs for facilities that must provide health care. Those increased costs are passed onto patients who are more and more on the fringes of not being able to afford increased premiums.

We are charged with increased efficiency in the delivery of health care in today’s world of practice. These efficiency mandates have resulted in increased pressure for us to see more patients in a shorter period of time. While decreasing the time I can spend with a patient, my patient’s problems haven’t changed. When one is attending to a patient problem with potential life-altering consequences, adequate time must be given to those problems.

Mid-level practitioners are physician extenders and not substitutes for physicians who have dedicated themselves to years of training and hours of continuing medical education post training. While there is a role for all of us, physicians by training will and must continue to remain at the helm of delivery of health care to all. In some locations the middle class and the poor have been priced out of being evaluated by a physician which is not a sound practice.

As we head home to celebrate holidays, we all have to strive at every level not to take shortcuts for efficiency. We all have to give our best and make sure that our patients receive the best care possible. Currently the health of patients in this country, while we are at the forefront of medical device and scientific discovery, lags behind other developed countries. If even one person comes into my clinic with Stage 4 cancer because of lack of access to even basic preventative services, our whole system suffers.

Most of us entered medicine with the compassion to work long hours for our patients without regard for social, insurance or financial status. A child from Appalachia who barely finds regular food deserves the best medical care that can be provided in this country. Families are under increased pressure to take valuable income resources to provide food and shelter by putting of much-needed preventive services; often the parents skip important screenings for their children.

If I sound as if I am a socialist, perhaps I am by the standards of this country. My belief is in a basic level of health care for all humans regardless of ability to pay. One’s health is key to one’s life, well-being and quality of life. When I see a patient with uncontrolled hypertension who doesn’t take inexpensive medication; which can result in permanent loss of renal function or stroke,  I am disappointed and sad.

As a physician, I can’t settle for allowing human beings, my patient’s to suffer because of lack of access to health care. I have challenged myself to be proactive in anticipating the affects of lack of health care funding on the health of my patients. I have challenged myself to find solutions and to keep finding solutions for my patients, all of my patients. For me, this is my holiday present to those I serve not because this will make my life easier but because it’s my challenge.

Read, evaluate and educate yourselves in the political aspects and the business of medicine. If you don’t have classes in medical school that offer this, form groups that can advocate this practice. I can’t say that it will be easy but I can say that your present and future patients will have better health because of you actions. It’s not too late to make a start and it won’t be easy or quick but this must be done by the greatest health care minds on the planet.

21 December, 2017 Posted by | medical school, practice of medicine | | Leave a comment

Continuing Medical Education

During the summer, I attempt to ramp up my efforts to complete as much continuing medical education as possible. During the academic year, it seems as if time gets away from me and I find myself busier and busier. Continuing medical education (CME) is a great way to refresh one’s knowledge of basic science while learning new information that will be of benefit to the patient’s in my practice.

I strive to keep work on my internal medicine knowledge as well as my surgical knowledge because my patients often have complex medical problems that send them to my care as a result of complications. While I have no problem consulting my family medicine and internal medicine colleagues for assistance in patient management, I need to be a vigilant as possible in the total care of the patient.

CME is far from being a chore for me because I love the learning process. It was the constant quest to learn how medicine and surgery works, that drew me to medical study in the first place. One becomes familiar with the volume of information in medical school but comfortable with the constant upgrading of one’s basic knowledge base in practice. I have found that every time I read even familiar information, I gain new insight and strategy for providing better care.

Certainly, one hates to be forced to do anything which is why the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirements became an expensive burden especially for newer physicians who are already struggling with heavy debt from medical school and pressure to build a practice. Most physicians are employees of large health care groups which adds to the pressure of practice building and maintenance. There are only 24 hours in a day; time becomes a precious commodity.

Finding a schedule that will allow one to keep up with journal reading, CME and MOC can become an added burden to already long hours and stressful work. Again, finding a balance becomes more and more important in order to have a lifestyle that can be enjoyed. Additionally, one does need precious “down-time” for mental sanity these days.

I don’t use my vacation time for CME or MOC as I need the vacation time for taking time away from academics and medicine. As I am older now, I appreciate my vacation time as valuable to my practice and teaching. There are few points for suffering in medicine on the part of physicians. This suffering can lead to “burn out” which isn’t good for anyone physically or mentally.

In closing, my recommendations are to find some manner of CME/MOC that works within and compliments one’s schedule. Take some time and try many methods of obtaining the hours that are needed for licensure. The worst stress comes with putting of CME until the last hours which like anything last-minute, becomes more stressful. Embrace the reinforcement of learning and find something that’s enjoyable, just like exercise, something that one can incorporate into one’s life on a regular basis.

28 July, 2017 Posted by | medical school, medicine, practice of medicine | | 6 Comments

Hospital Haiku

“hospital moonlight

cacophony of machines

teardrops cascading”

As we come to the end of National Physician’s Week and today, National Physician’s Day, I related this haiku from one of my most gifted and amazing friends. Some years back, he suffered a  critical and life-threatening illness that resulted in profound changes in his life with some time in the intensive care unit. This illness changed a man who is talented beyond belief, a brilliant creative genius and professor in ways that few of us can relate or even imagine. Still today, he’s affected by his illness and the events that surrounded it.

I share this haiku because it brings to mind, something that we as physicians must always remember about our patients. They place their health, their trust and many of the most intimate aspects of their lives in our hands. With our hands, we have to care for them; relate to them, in many ways hold them, and be mindful of the honor and privilege of having them place their lives in our care.

As such, we also have to be mindful that illness changes their reality and in many cases their lives profoundly especially when they are critically ill. We have to reach out and extend more comfort over the “cacophony of machines” that becomes the background of their intensive care and sometimes hospital care experience. We have to block that “cacophony” whenever and wherever we can.

I remember watching a tear roll down the side of the face of one of my ICU patients who appeared comatose. The nurses were bathing him and chatting with each other as they turned him. I saw the tear; asked them to speak with him over the ICU noise background. I asked them to play music in his room and I always held his hand when I entered the room to examine him. I am sure that my soul could feel his soul even though he didn’t ever speak to me. I never saw that tear again, after we began speaking and focusing on him, holding his hand, touching his face, and playing his favorite music even though he did not recover from his illness.

I seek to connect with my patients without exception as that is my honor as a physician/surgeon. I spent years learning the science and techniques of medicine and surgery but in these, the later years of my clinical practice, my focus is on the art of medical practice. Within that art is my chance to give some of my heart to those who have placed their trust in me (and my training). I strive to be more human and more comforting. To do less of the science and more of the art is great joy for me. My joy is in the connections; kind of strange for a surgeon.

On this National Doctor’s Day, I am honored to be a physician and grateful for all that this profession has given me. This profession has given me far more than I can give back but I will spend as much time as possible giving as much as I can to those who are in my care.

30 March, 2017 Posted by | medical school, medicine, practice of medicine | , , | 2 Comments

(Re-post) The Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) Process

I am re-posting a previous post because Monday of Match Week is coming up. People may need to learn about the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) process very quickly. It is not anticipated that there will be huge numbers of positions available in this program but one does need to know how the program works and how to make it work for you. Good luck to all of those who match and those who are going through the SOAP process this year. It’s stressful but it’s exciting to move forward with the next career steps in medicine.

Introduction

In previous years, a process known as “The Scramble” existed for:

  • People who were unmatched on the Monday of Match Week
  • Unfilled residency programs
  • People who matched to an advanced position but not a first-year residency position.

The Scramble was also utilized as a primary residency application process for people who didn’t want to go though the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) who often submitted their application materials via fax to programs who didn’t fill (from the list provided on the Monday of Match Week) or even contacted those programs via phone or e-mail. The Scramble does not exist any longer and programs who participate in the Match cannot accept applications outside ERAS. In short, the SOAP process is a different entity with hazards and plenty of opportunities for mistakes on the part of applicants.

SOAP is NOT “The Scramble”

Programs that participated in the Match are no longer allowed to interact with applicants outside of ERAS as this would be a violation of the Match participation agreement. This means that all applications to unfilled programs (those programs that are on the unfilled list) have to be submitted via ERAS. For programs, this means that e-mails, fax machines and phone lines are not jammed with people attempting to submit application materials. Frequently in previous years, many applicants (IMGs, FMGs in particular) could pay for a mass fax service to fax applications to every program on the unfilled list as soon as the Scramble opened which often jammed machines. Most residency programs were only interested in filling with desirable applicants who may not have matched (by mistake usually) and were not able to screen for those applicants because their fax machines, e-mails and phone lines were jammed.

SOAP should not be your primary residency application

If you are seeking a residency position in the United States, you need to meet the deadlines for ERAS with your application materials. In short, you need to submit your application materials (to your medical school if you are an American grad or to ERAS if your are an FMG/IMG) and participate in the regular Match.  If you are an applicant with problems such as failures on any of the USMLE Steps or failures in medical school coursework, do not make the mistake of believing that unfilled programs are desperate and will take a chance on you rather than remain unfilled. First, there are far more applicants in the regular match than ever before. Many people who will find themselves unmatched either overestimated their competitiveness for a program or were just below the cutoff for a program to rank. If a program interviewed you but you didn’t make the cutoff for them or you didn’t rank them at all, you have a better shot at securing a position in that program through SOAP than an applicant who didn’t interview at all. Programs would rather take an applicant that they have seen and interviewed rather than just a person on paper (which is why trying to use the SOAP rather than the Match is a poor strategy).

You are limited to an absolute maximum of 45 programs in the SOAP

In the SOAP, your maximum is 45 programs. You can apply to 30 programs during the first cycle (Monday) and 10 programs during the second cycle (Wednesday) and 5 programs on the third cycle (Thursday).  Applications do not roll over so that if you don’t get a match by the third day the start of the second cycle, you are likely not going to find much out there. There are more applicants who will be unmatched (because there are more people participating) thus the positions will go quickly because programs can review applications to chose the most desirable candidates with the SOAP system.

If you have problems that prevented you from getting any interviews in the regular Match season or you didn’t get enough interviews to find a Match, then you are going to be less likely to find a position in the SOAP. This means that you won’t have a position for residency. If this happens (you know if you have academic or USMLE/COMLEX problems), have a contingency plan in place. This means that rather than sitting around wishing, hoping and praying while your classmates and colleagues are going on interviews, you need to be looking at alternatives to residency that will enable you to earn a living and alternatives that will enhance your chances of getting a position in the next Match.

Strategies to enhance your chances of getting a PGY-1 position

If you know that you are a weaker candidate (failure on USMLE/COMLEX Step I, failure in medical school coursework, dismissal from medical school and readmission), then don’t apply to the more competitive specialties. Don’t apply to university-based specialties in the lesser competitive specialties and apply to more rather than less programs. If you have academic problems, you are likely not going to match in Radiology, Opthalmology, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Radiation Oncology or Anesthesiology. You are likely not going to match in university-based programs in Surgery or any of the surgical specialties, Psychiatry, Pathology, OB-GYN,Neurology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Family Medicine or Internal Medicine. In short, community-based programs in Family Medicine and Internal Medicine may be your best options.Do not believe that if there are unfilled positions in programs that are university-based or competitive, that you are going to snag one of those positions in the SOAP. A majority of those programs would rather go unfilled than fill with a less desirable applicant (in spite of what you hear, those programs are not desperate enough to take any applicant just to fill).

If you are an IMG/FMG, you have to meet the requirements for application which means that your USMLE Scores likely will have to be higher than those for American grads and you can’t have any USMLE failures. There are also cutoffs in terms of year of graduation from medical school for many programs. In short, you need to look at the application requirements for any residency program that you apply to and make sure that you are eligible (better yet, that you exceed) those application requirements.

The best resource for estimating your competitiveness for a particular specialty is to look at the previous years  National Residency Matching Program ( NRMP) reports for those specialties. You can look at the characteristics for matched and unmatched individuals to see where you fit. With a greater number of medical school graduates (most American medical schools increased their class sizes) and the number of residency positions staying static, there are fewer positions out there to be filled. There will be fewer position in the SOAP and the competition for those positions will be greater. Since the competition in the SOAP is greater, it is best to avoid having to use that system all together if possible.

If you know that you are a weaker candidate, apply for preliminary (not transitional) positions in either Internal Medicine or Surgery. You will stand a better chance of getting a preliminary position (more available) and you will have a job where you can demonstrate your clinical abilities for one year before you re-enter the Match for the next year. If you do a good job in your preliminary year, score high on the in-training exams and perform at a high level clinically, you may be able to secure a categorical second-year position in the same program where you do your preliminary position or you may position yourself to become more competitive for another specialty at another institution. The upside to this strategy is that you will not be relying on the SOAP as a primary means of residency application but the downside is that you have to be ready to perform extremely well in your preliminary position without exception. In short, getting into a preliminary position can be a huge asset if you are ready to work hard and prove yourself but can be a huge liability if you are not ready for clinical residency and perform poorly.

Things that generally DO NOT enhance your chances of matching

Doing graduate degree work if you do not match will generally not help your chances of matching. If you can complete a graduate degree (such as an MPH), you may enhance your chances but most graduate degree programs close their application submission dates before you know whether or not you have matched. If you anticipate that you are not going to match, then apply for graduate school long before Match Week or you will find that you can’t get into graduate school. Additionally, you need to complete your degree before the clinical year starts after the next Match. This means that you have to be able to ensure on your next ERAS application, that you will complete all of your degree requirements by the start of your PGY-1 year. Again, if you know that you have a high change of not matching, get your graduate school application done ahead of time or better year, delay entering the match and just apply for graduate school outright (can’t do a Ph.D) but plan on spending no more than one year away from clinical medicine.

Hanging out and “schmoozing” with residency attendings if you are not in their residency program is generally a waste of time. Doing additional observerships (IMG/FMG) generally will not help you if you have done enough before you applied. Working in “research” will generally not help you unless you already have an advanced degree (MS or Ph.D)  or you are able to produce a major paper or article for a national or international peer-reviewed journal. When I say produce, I mean first author not just run a few experiments  or enter data. If you can get yourself on a major clinical research project where you are actually gathering some clinical experience, you can use this to enhance yourself for residency but you face stiff competition for these types of projects and you need an unrestricted license to practice medicine (difficult to obtain without a passing score on USMLE Step 3 + 1-2 years of residency training).

Summary

Making sure that you match requires a bit of strategy and planning for everyone but for some applicants it will be a difficult process.

  • People who have academic and USMLE/COMLEX problems will have even more problems getting into a residency
  • It is important NOT to rely on the SOAP as a primary means to apply to residency programs because you put yourself at a distinct disadvantage in terms of the number of programs that you can apply
  • You need to make sure that you are even eligible for the SOAP in that you have to have applied to the Main Residency Match (at least one program) and are fully or partially unmatched.

Learn as much about the process as possible as soon as possible. The decisions that you make in the residency application process can profoundly affect your career in medicine. Educate yourself about all aspects of the process as there is little room for error.

11 March, 2017 Posted by | difficulty in medical school, Match Day, residency, scramble | , | 1 Comment

We Do This

Last evening I was visiting with my classmates in one of the ministry classes that I am taking. As we moved through our discussion of our readings, my classmates nibbled on German Chocolate brownies that I had baked the morning before. I love to bake, therapy for this surgeon, as it is very nice to create something and watch other enjoy it. One of my mates produced a bottle of Benedictine with a supply of glassware; brownies and Benedictine!

One of our discussions in class centered around meeting Jesus. Quite an interesting discussion for a couple of physicians; two of us in the class. I related a story about one of my first patients that I treated as a medical student. This wonderful little patient was affectionately named “Ratso” by my supervising resident at the time. He was a patient in our Veterans Hospital coming in when his lung disease would get out of control.

“Doc, I was holding hands with Jesus”, he exclaimed to me as he began to respond to our treatments. He had been quite disoriented when his blood carbon dioxide level had achieved values that would be incompatible with life for most people. This patient not only had high levels, he turned the corner pretty quickly. “Yes, I will believe you saw Jesus”, I said to him as he clearly recognized me at last. I was seeing Jesus too.

So this is why I do this. For Ratso and the hundreds of others that I treat with care and love. Remember that what we do is like no other profession out there.

9 December, 2016 Posted by | medical school | , | Leave a comment

New Beginnings!

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) presentation for young women (ages 7-9) from the inner city. I watched wide-eyed young people explore experiments with wonder and discovery. For many of these children, this was the first exposure to science at this level. Each young woman more excited to see the next and the next station. I found myself just enjoying their pure joy and excitement in learning new materials; with much encouragement from the professors (male and female) in attendance. I brought some of my surgical instruments with me combined with photos of them in use in the operating room. The whole experience was joyful and wonderful for me. I found myself back in primary school, excited at the prospect of all of the new knowledge that was in front of me. It made my heart glad once again.

This past week, I was notified by one of my colleagues who works in the Information Technology field, that she has been accepted into Physician Assistant school, the culmination of several years of careful preparation to change into a completely different field. The sheer joy that she expresses with the prospect of entering medicine is visceral. Once again, I saw and felt the same joy as seeing those young woman who dream of something far beyond their everyday worlds. It’s a great feeling. I was taken back to the time when I received that first medical school acceptance, something that I didn’t anticipate was possible yet was in my hand.

Many folks are in the residency application process, the medical school acceptance process, the university acceptance process and other changes from their present state. I would invite you to dream big but enjoy the process, even the uncertainty. From my vantage point after years of practicing medicine I can say that there is nothing better than solving problems for my patients and their families. I can say that to have the privilege of the practice of medicine, in spite of the flaws in our health care systems, is still quite magical.

I can also say that the privilege of teaching those who seek to first prepare themselves to enter this profession is one of the greatest gifts for me. Just recently, a colleague, one of the greatest academics that I will ever know, said that the hours I spend in office are a sign of a “true academic”. These words from him touched my heart like no others. My response is that at this point, as I am teaching physical exam skills, my students need my presence and my guidance at this critical time. In short, I remember wanting as many “skill-checks” from my physical exam professors in medical school as I could find. I always thought I was worrying them but now I know that as true professors of medicine, they welcomed my presence.

As I watch young women daring to dream, my IT colleague about to enter Physician Assistant school and my wonderful students, some struggling but all “testing ” themselves with new horizons, I find myself grateful, no thankful for being here to witness these new beginnings.

6 March, 2016 Posted by | medical school, medical school admissions, medicine, physician assistant school | , , | Leave a comment

The Fastest Way to a Surgeon’s Heart

As I sat in my office yesterday lamenting my lack of love on this upcoming Valentine’s Day, I stared at my Mardi Gras beads left over from Tuesday’s dinner. Tuesday had been a long day that was filled with endless paperwork coupled with cold temperatures and snow. I am training for a spring marathon thus I needed to get some road mileage but couldn’t run outside in the new falling snow (ice underneath) and sub-30F temperatures. As I finished the last signature, closed the last chart and checked to make sure my dictations had been sent, I decided to go to a Mardi Gras party with a few friends. It’s the last fling before the Lenten season begins and for me, an opportunity to enjoy the company of some folks who have little to do with medicine. I jumped at the chance.

As I entered the Mardi Gras location, the sound of New Orleans jazz coupled with the fragrance of jambalaya filled my senses. I was enveloped in beads (no I didn’t have to display a bare chest to get them) and hugs. “It’s going to be a good Lent”, one of my friends remarked. “I can’t believe that Ash Wednesday will be here tomorrow. It’s so soon”, I remarked. Both of us scooped up the jambalaya (mine vegetarian) and settled in to enjoy our treats with a glass of wine. What a nice way to shake off the cold and snow outside.

Yes, Tuesday was a great experience; so needed but Ash Wednesday began and then came Thursday and my mini-despair at not having a special someone in my life to acknowledge on Valentine’s Day. This whole St. Valentine’s Day is “hokey”, I reminded myself as a couple of my married partners ordered roses for their wives. Yes, I was a bit envious of those lucky women who would receive them on “the day”. Even my unmarried partner was planning a nice dinner with his new love interest. Oh, this was too much for my cynical heart to bear. I decided to hit the gym and pump some iron to shake off these feelings.

As I was leaving the surgeon’s lounge, the nurse manager of the operating room touched my shoulder. “Hey doc, here’s a package for you”, she said. “Gee”, I thought, “someone is actually sending me something?” She handed me a small parcel that was sealed with iron-clad tape, addressed to the hospital operating room that was clearly from a surgical supply company. How did she know it was for me?

I tore open the box with my car keys. Inside, there were several small shiny instruments. Ah, new Castroviejo’s (instruments for delicate work). Be still my beating heart. Someone remembered me and my Valentine Day came early.  Yes, I am feeling the love!DSCN0534

 

13 February, 2016 Posted by | medical school, practice of medicine | , , | 1 Comment

End of the year reflections

At the end of each calendar year, I try to reflect on what I have learned and what surprises me. After some years of teaching and medical/surgical practice, one would believe that there is nothing surprising out there for an old surgeon but I have moments of amazement and wonder every day. This is the nature of my practice of medicine even today.

This past year, I have become more comfortable with my extreme connections with my patients and students. I see the greatness of their humanity and in the case of my students, I have had some moments of disappointment in their lack of humanity. In the case of my patients, I see more humanity because I spend more and more time with those who have cognitive, intellectual and physical impairments.

My patients with cognitive impairments often communicate without words. For me, this is the greatest gift that I have received from them and I am fortunate to be able to stop and make those connections. From a wonderful colleague (Daniel C. Potts MD; his blog is linked to this blog), I have learned to be more mindful which has enabled me to stop in the moment and appreciate all that this group of patients has to say and wants to say. These relationships are pure gold for me.

My patients with intellectual impairments show me the wonder of human achievement daily. Most of this group of patients thrive on having a physician that connects with them and not their caregiver or the person hired to accompany them on visits to the physician’s clinic. It takes a bit more time to make that connection but the relationship here is as rich for me as for the patient. I am thankful that I make and take the time to give these patients what they crave no matter how much it falls outside of the time constraints.

My students have been the greatest surprise this year; not always in a rewarding manner. Many have shown an unwillingness to meet goals in the professionalism that the practice of medicine demands. I know that it is my job, as professor, to make sure that they have the tools for practice but this year has been a challenge for me in many ways.

Many of my students have a fixation on comparing themselves to others. My mantra for countering these comparisons is to say that the only person with whom one can compare, is yourself. Every day, or every second for that matter, is a chance to change your thinking. What another person does or does not do, has no bearing on what you can do for yourself. I constantly remind my students to use social media for information but evaluate that information and surely do not use what is posted on Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook as a means of comparison with others. You have to be the best person that you can be and not compare yourself to what you believe others are.

The lack of appreciation for the humanity of those who would be the future patients for my students is also a challenge for me as their professor. I was fortunate to have mentors and professors in medicine and surgery who reminded me of the privilege of practice. My professors spoke often of the extreme trust that patients place in physicians. We earn that trust by mastery of our craft and by humility because we are not the healers; we are the instruments of healing. To practice medicine/surgery for ego is a straight line for burnout and exhaustion because of all professions, medicine will destroy an ego very quickly.

I am grateful for being able to climb onto the roof of my hospital (14 floors up) and just meditate in the early mornings. In the predawn darkness, I can hear the traffic below, smell the fuel of the helicopter as it lands and I can take a few moments in the stillness of that place to center myself. I can see for miles on some mornings but on others, I am surrounded by rain and fog which is equally comforting. My days of sailing have taught me to love the moments before the sun rises and appreciate the ever changing colors of each new day.

As the Christmas holidays approach and the first semester has come to an end, I try to take some moments to appreciate my wonderful friends. They are a source of wonder and discovery. This year, one very new friend has been a “touchstone” for me in terms of validating what I always knew in terms of the spiritual nature of medicine. His friendship has been truly inspiring and affirming. Though we are totally opposite in just about every aspect of our lives, we are in total agreement in terms of how we approach medicine. I am very grateful for all that I learn from him on a daily basis.

This year has been one of change for me as I have achieved many of my goals in terms of physical and mental conditioning. I have made running and weightlifting a significant part of my lifestyle. I was a varsity athlete in college but moved away from regular conditioning as I navigated graduate and medical school. I have reached many of my physical goals, being able to play rugby again but I am working on getting stronger and stronger.

This year, I learned to kayak (my new means of exploring nature) which has added a different range of being able to appreciate being outdoors. Being solitary in nature for me, has always meant hiking, again so that I can be alone with my thoughts and meditations. With learning to kayak, I have been able to explore rivers and two of the Great Lakes (Erie and Superior). Being on the water alone in a kayak is to perceive much in terms of spirit renewal. I strongly recommend finding some means to get away with your thoughts and enjoy what is around even if you are only able to take a walk in a nearby park.

This year, one of my extreme experiences was to spend a week hiking Joshua Tree National Park in the California desert. There is no location on earth like this magical place. The desert was magical, spiritual and allowed me to appreciate each grain of sand that surrounded me along with the huge stone formations of Joshua Tree. The Joshua trees were amazing in that no two are alike but all are like friends with arms outstretched in fellowship. I loved each spine on each cactus plant too. The desert, the surrounding mountains and the Joshua trees gave me a great sense of place in humanity.

As this semester ends for those who are in medical school, those trying to gain admission to medical school and for those who are in some stage of medical practice, I would hope that you strive to see your place in humanity by any means that you can. I would also hope that you enjoy the spiritual and connective nature of the profession that you have dedicated yourself to. There is pure magic in what we do on a daily basis and I am very grateful for the privilege to see that magic.

 

 

17 December, 2015 Posted by | academics, medical school | , , | 3 Comments