Medicine From The Trenches

Experiences from undergradute, graduate school, medical school, residency and beyond.

Getting Into Routine

Since the nature of medicine (and life) is change, getting into the best routine to greet and excel in a changing environment is being in the best mental and physical condition possible. It’s very easy with study, long hours of duty and other demands, to gravitate towards anything that bring rest and relaxation/lack of stress. My challenge for those who are starting school, getting ready to start school, starting a new year of clinical duties or any changes; is to have a routine with good stress that allows for optimal performance within the context of changes and challenges.

For many in medicine, stress is the bane of our existence. We are stressed with long hours that often demand the good performance in early morning hours, as most of the population sleeps. We are stressed with keeping up with our academics and studies that mark our ever-changing profession. We are stressed with keeping a sound balance in life that will enable us to enjoy our personal lives in addition to our professional lives. This sound balance is as vital to having a great career and general well-being but finding that balance is not easy or quick.

As the summer has always been the time that I try to improve on my routines and make changes, I will invite you to consider making small changes that will help you deal with the mental and physical challenges to come as your careers change. These challenges need not derail your health and mental resilience but might enhance the enjoyment of your career at any stage.

Good Nutrition

When one is tired physically, mental acumen wanes and one becomes both mentally and physically exhausted. This mental and physical exhaustion can lead to choosing foods that are high in sugar or fat which might lead to a quick energy fix but weight gain in the long run. Trust me, carrying extra weight around doesn’t help with mental or physical exhaustion, often leading to more of both.

Eating a well-balanced diet that has more fresh fruits and vegetables with less fat and refined sugars helps keep your weight under control in addition to keeping you healthier. You can make small changes in terms of grabbing a piece of fresh fruit for a snack rather than relying on the high fat alternatives of the vending machine. Also cooking a week’s worth of healthier food that you pack rather than eating the burger and fries in the hospital/school cafe can help make small changes.

Small changes can lead to larger changes or that routine that becomes more comfortable for you. While I love an occasional burger and sharing fries/chips with my friend (the only way I indulge in these), I keep these occasions as special and not routine. Not only does eating a healthier diet help my immune system, my healthier diet helps me avoid long term chronic disease such as obesity, atherosclerosis and diabetes.

Regular exercise

Exercise tends to be one of those activities that suffers when one enters a demanding profession. It is easy post call, to come home, drop on the sofa and rest. This was my routine in medical school where I gained significant weight after being robustly active during my graduate school years. It took years of work to rid my body of the excess weight but once regular exercise became my routine, I found that I had more energy and more time rather less.

Today, I am a distance runner, using that time on the running trail to work out problems, meditate and simply enjoy myself. I have strength and energy for my work and for recreation. I also have a greater capacity for dealing with stress and the physical stress of a 10-mile run helps everything in my life. Running is quite solitary which appeals to me but anything that gets your heart rate up at least 30 minutes 5 times per week is better than nothing.

My workout time is as precious as my work time. I have mapped out running routes around my hospital, in my neighborhood and when I travel. I keep running gear in my locker (running shoes and shorts) so that I have no excuse not to move. I also try to get my workout done in the early morning before I start my day.

You don’t need to block hours of time for a bit of an aerobic challenge as you can run up a flight of stairs several times per day; park the auto further away and walk briskly to your workplace; take a brisk walk for 10 minutes as a time over lunch with a friend. Distance running isn’t for everyone but most of us can do something as simple as walking. Incorporate small changes which can become a habit that becomes part of your life.

Avoiding excuses (reasons)

As one becomes mentally stressed and physically exhausted, reasons for not adhering to healthy habits abound. For each of us, there will always be challenges that take us out of our routines. Take a moment to reflect on what reasons/excuses become commonplace and how you might meet or avoid them. For me, I looked at every hour of my day and examined where I could make small changes. Those small changes became my routines.

For example, I wanted to have more time for journal reading thus I looked for where I could set aside 30 minutes daily for my journals. I ended up finding at least an hour for my journal reading which became a welcome habit. I looked at where I could “sneak in” a workout even on my busiest day. I also left time for complete relaxation when I needed that too.

Staying in good physical condition is the best way to stay in good mental condition. As I look around me, those friends who are physically fit are the most mentally resilient too. In my life, my good physical condition has been a key to many successes in my career. As my physical capacity increased, with a combination of endurance and strength training, the greater my capacity to work and play with my pleasures coming from enjoyment of craft beer, good food and fellowship with friends and colleagues.

Final Thoughts

Take a moment and look for the following:

  • Where you might incorporate small changes that will increase your physical conditioning.
  • Where you might substitute better food choices in terms of avoiding high fat and high refined sugary foods for foods that are whole grain, fresh fruits and vegetables with leaner meats.
  • Where you might take time for small tasks that enhance your professional development.
  • Where you can find some time for pure recreation and enjoyment of life.

Make the changes today, that will help your life and enjoyment of life in the long run. It’s easier than you imagine as you don’t have to become a spartan or fitness nut. Your studies and your mental health with be much stronger which is the key to success in today’s world of medicine.

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18 July, 2017 - Posted by | academics, medical school, practice of medicine |

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