Medicine From The Trenches

Experiences from undergradute, graduate school, medical school, residency and beyond.

Heading into Residency!

It’s that time of the year when many recent medical school graduates are in the heat of getting things organized for the beginning of residency. Residency is the next phase of medical education in the United States and as such, is a period of rapid change and learning. You will be fairly independent in your care of patients; studying in a different manner from your medical school coursework but definitely getting your style of learning and practice honed.

This is a time to drop any pretenses of being the perfect “intern” and let yourself learn and absorb as much knowledge from those in your program who are more experienced. If you have traveled to a position that is different from your fourth-year medical school hospital, you have to learn how the place works as well as how you will work within your locale. When your ward work starts formally, you want to have your organizational system in place, know your way around and have your most important home location settled and ready.

For example, you should have made sure that all of your training licensure materials have been taken care of. You need to make sure you have your paperwork completed long before your program starts “New Resident Orientation”. There will be many details that need to be presented thus you don’t want to add to things by not having your paperwork completed.

For many, USMLE Step 3 will come into play rapidly. For this exam which becomes something of a nuisance for many, myself included, you have to have a date in mind to complete this test. For my residency, which was in General Surgery, I knew that my in-training exam was in January, thus I set a goal of taking Step 3 within the next two months after my in-training exam. I knew that I wanted to place most of my emphasis on my surgery exam, thus I dedicated about 30 minutes per day on reviewing my medicine for Step 3. I set this schedule into my schedule of reading so that it became a habit.

In terms of reading, I asked my second-year residents which books and papers would be best to start my reading for both my in-training exam and Step 3. Again, I wanted to rely on the experience of those who were immediately above me in my program. I also sought the wisdom of my faculty adviser in my baseline reading too. If there was anything that I didn’t count on, it was that I wasn’t able to set up a regular physical conditioning program, something that would have made my PYG-1 year more efficient.

In other posts, I have emphasized the importance of taking care of your physical conditioning. Not only is being in good shape helpful for stress-reduction, good conditioning is most helpful on those very long nights when call seems to go on forever. If you are in good aerobic condition, you perform better even when you are exhausted. Figure out a way to eat well, low fat and low sugar foods along with doing at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise five to six days per week. Your rest and your brain with be grateful.

If you haven’t figured out how you will keep track of your patients, look into any system that might work for you. At this time, you can do a little experimentation and make adjustments when you begin seeing patients. I had to alter my patient tracking system from the one I used as a fourth-year medical student because my residency hospital patient tracking/health record system was different. It’s easier to make adjustments than find yourself overwhelmed because you didn’t have a system to begin with.

Make your home your sanctuary of solitude in any way you can. For me, my solitude involved investing in dark curtains in my bedroom that I could close on a bright sunny day post call. I found that I needed the darkness and cool for rest and relaxation. I also found that I functioned best post call when I didn’t encounter another human being for a few hours. Figure what works best for you and stick to it.

I made a schedule for my post call days so that I could do routine chores such as laundry and grocery shopping as part of my relaxation. Grocery stores that were open all night became wonderful for me. I planned my menus for the week, cooked on weekends that I wasn’t on call and kept my freezer stocked with meals that I could pop into the microwave rather than hitting the fast-food establishments. I have continued this practice even today because as I have aged, good nutrition is very important.

I used one of my spare bedrooms as an office. In my home office, I kept my textbooks, computers and study materials, much as I had done in medical school. Since I kept a regular reading schedule, I checked off book chapters and topics as I completed them. Even with a regular reading schedule, I always felt that my fellow residents were better read than I was, even though it probably wasn’t the case.

Finally, I had to schedule in time for my friends and family. Residency is a very hectic time but family/friend time is as important as reading and study time. Most Sundays, if I was able, I attended church if for no other reason, to thank my Higher Power for giving me the strength to stay on top of my work. Find a religious institution in your location and attend once in awhile if you don’t belong to any particular religion. It’s just another outlook and fellowship with people who are likely not hospital folk-good for your brain.

My favorite hobby, outside of sleeping on my rare days off, was going to the movies. My restless brain needed to enjoy some pure entertainment. While television can be tempting at home, especially since you can be in your “jammies”, it was better for me to get out of the house for a couple of hours and watch a movie or attend a concert. Football, lacrosse and soccer were also great getaways for me too.

In conclusion, residency is going to be a time of learning, reading and stress. Most of the stress will be self-imposed because any new situations are stressful for most humans. You will be learning about your patients in depth, trying to anticipate their needs and keeping your senior residents/attendings up to date on how you are caring for the patients on the services.

Again, try not to take yourself too seriously in terms of forgiving yourself for making mistakes but learn from those mistakes. The people who are more experienced on your team only expect that you do your share of the work and that you learn from your mistakes. It turns out that this is a great way to learn what you need and sets you up for getting the best experience for your program.

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17 June, 2017 Posted by | intern, life in medicine, relaxation, residency | | Leave a comment