Medicine From The Trenches

Experiences from undergradute, graduate school, medical school, residency and beyond.

Time keeps moving and it’s is a blessing that it does keep moving.

In most places, we await the end of 2016 and the beginning of 2017. The passing of one year and the advent of another full of hope and promise for most of us. Still, nothing is new because time always keeps moving and everything changes often from one instant to the next. I have allowed this movement, this continuum to spur me to renew and reinvent myself without question.

This past year to my surprise, I embraced long distance running. My stress level dropped to nothing; my self-empowerment went to high levels. As I race along streets at 3AM, the only time I can get 1.5 hours of pure running into my crammed schedule, I do this movement for me and my sanity. I work on problems, I accept my world with joy and gratitude. This turns out to be a great way to get every day started and every challenge faced head on.

I will often mull some paper or new information as I tread along my winding path in my neighborhood near one the the Great Lakes in midwest United States. I can always hear the ebb and flow of the waves of the lake as I run along the beach; even if it’s too dark for me to see them. On a bright moonlit early morning, now long before sunrise on these shorter winter days, I love seeing my breath just in front of me.

Since I live in a suburban area, I seldom meet any automobiles in the early morning. If I meet anything, it’s a heard of deer grazing or a racoon crossing the empty street heading for the deep woods next to the lake. The deer ignore me but after spotting a coyote or two, I run with mace but still I run with emphasis and determination.

The thing about running, or even a brisk walk to begin your day, is that you can’t do these tasks for others. As a physician, my life and my practice has centered around being present to help my patients and students with solving their problems even if I ignore my concerns. With running, I do this for me and me alone; heady for non-self sacrifice. I think about me and how my middle-aged body runs faster and faster in the cold early morning darkness.

Daily running has a way of adding discipline into every aspect of one’s life. I eat healthy and clean because I know that high fat, high simple sugar foods will zap this burst of energy that running gives. I also forgive my occasional indulgence of beer on a non-practice evening because I have already run and exercised for the day. I also know that I am at my thinnest and lightest weight in my adult life; enjoying how well my clothes fit and how comfortable I am parking far from my destinations and hiking the extra distance.

The discipline that I have achieved with running, eating healthy and lifting a few weights has allowed me to keep a ready smile on my face and a song in my heart. I find that I simply enjoy interacting with my patients; joyful that I can help them feel better and meet the challenges of their worlds. This is some of the true magic of medicine that we keep learning, practicing and enjoying our art no matter where one is in the process. For many, just navigating the health care process is a source of added frustration and fear. Let your patients know that you are always the final common path for them as they place their health and trust in you; have their best interests in mind always.

As this year draws to a close, remind yourself of why you entered this profession and how fortunate you are to be able to help your fellow humans in any way small or large. Remind yourself that while this is a job for you, it’s often a change of life for your patients. Remind yourself that there is magic in empowering your patients; appreciating their fellowship and challenging yourself to be the best that you can be especially being authentic.

31 December, 2016 Posted by | life in medicine, medical school | | 1 Comment

We Do This

Last evening I was visiting with my classmates in one of the ministry classes that I am taking. As we moved through our discussion of our readings, my classmates nibbled on German Chocolate brownies that I had baked the morning before. I love to bake, therapy for this surgeon, as it is very nice to create something and watch other enjoy it. One of my mates produced a bottle of Benedictine with a supply of glassware; brownies and Benedictine!

One of our discussions in class centered around meeting Jesus. Quite an interesting discussion for a couple of physicians; two of us in the class. I related a story about one of my first patients that I treated as a medical student. This wonderful little patient was affectionately named “Ratso” by my supervising resident at the time. He was a patient in our Veterans Hospital coming in when his lung disease would get out of control.

“Doc, I was holding hands with Jesus”, he exclaimed to me as he began to respond to our treatments. He had been quite disoriented when his blood carbon dioxide level had achieved values that would be incompatible with life for most people. This patient not only had high levels, he turned the corner pretty quickly. “Yes, I will believe you saw Jesus”, I said to him as he clearly recognized me at last. I was seeing Jesus too.

So this is why I do this. For Ratso and the hundreds of others that I treat with care and love. Remember that what we do is like no other profession out there.

9 December, 2016 Posted by | medical school | , | Leave a comment