Medicine From The Trenches

Experiences from medical school, residency and beyond.

Make Your Life Simple

As many are starting medical school, the most important task to master is getting your life under control. You are starting a journey of study that will absorb most of your waking hours in the next couple of years. Because of this, you have to take more than a few moments of time and figure out your basic needs. Starting medical school without taking a bit of life inventory is asking for problems that may cut into your precious study time. You have to figure out what you need and separate your absolute needs from the things that you want.

All of us who sit in that first lecture; open that first syllabus or textbook want to do well. We didn’t come to medical school to do poorly in our coursework. We seek out the wisdom of those who are a year in front of us and we start with the intention of “learning it all”. This drive for mastery comes largely from our premedical coursework where we always knew that in order to get into medical school, we had to have high grades and scholarship. Once in medical school, staying there and doing well becomes our next tasks as we adjust to the volume of information that will be presented in our pre-clinical coursework.

Making your life simple means that your living arrangements have to stable and comfortable. I largely used my apartment for showering, eating and sleeping. Much of my eating was done as I poured over my lecture notes and textbooks. I quickly found that doing much of my study at school was less distracting at first but I also found that heading off to bed early, getting up around 1AM and studying at home was also good for me. There were fewer interruptions from the phone and others as I was getting up when many were heading to bed.

My bed and bedroom were quiet, dark and restful. I refused to have any study materials in my bedroom; using my bed only for sleep. I also found that breaking my study time into 50-minute chunks worked well for me as I would often pace and recite my coursework, as a review, into a tape recorder so that I could listen to my study tapes on the subway as I made my way to class each day.

Making my life simple also meant that I bought my food for the week, on the weekends; making grocery shopping a break from studying. I had a great study group that like to meet on Saturday afternoon which meant that Saturday morning was great for food shopping. I also cleaned my house on that precious Saturday morning; getting rid of clutter that made me tired and less efficient.

Making my life simple meant that I planned each of my study sessions carefully. I made a list of what I needed to accomplish and marked off tasks as I completed them . Seeing those check marks gave my brain a sense of accomplishment that helped make the volume of material seem less intimidating. Still, I never felt completely ready for an exam but I always felt that I had a chance to do well because I studied for mastery (took no shortcuts during first and second year). “You can’t review what you haven’t learned in the first place.” was a favorite quote from one of my professors.

I always attended class prepared for the upcoming lecture by putting the previous lecture in perspective. This task helped me to see the “big picture” which can be neglected if one focuses solely on memorization. I sought understanding and perspective; organizing my studies around mastery rather than memorization.

If I have one regret in terms of my medical school work, it is that my physical conditioning suffered. As a graduate student, I was a middle-distance runner. My running helped manage stress and kept my weight down. I gained weight in medical school because the fastest foods were the ones that were unhealthy (high fat, high sugar). When I finally lost my medical school weight, it was my distance running that brought calm and organization to my life. Find a way to incorporate a minimum of 30 minutes of aerobic exercise in your schedule. Trust me, your grades will improve; your sleep will be more sound and efficient; your life will be simpler but more effective.

At the first sign of trouble, see your faculty instructors for help. They are the experts on the curriculum and should be your first and best resources if you need assistance. Your classmates are great but you should do a knowledge check with your instructor long before the exam comes up. Your instructor can also help you with organization should you become overwhelmed (very easy with the volume of material to master).

Finally, don’t forget family and friends. These people keep you sane but they can take up time if you don’t plan your interactions carefully. I often stated at the outset, “I have a couple of hours, let’s have a quick cup of coffee or breakfast”. I would set a timer on my watch so that I didn’t go overtime. It may seem rude but they adjusted to my general absence and helped my stay on task.

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28 July, 2016 - Posted by | academics, medical school |

2 Comments »

  1. Thank you for your advice! I need to remember this! Great post!

    Comment by coffeamedicus | 31 July, 2016 | Reply

    • Thank-you for your comment.

      Comment by drnjbmd | 1 August, 2016 | Reply


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