Medicine From The Trenches

Experiences from medical school, residency and beyond.

“It’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon.”

I am in the process of training for my first marathon. As a middle-distance runner at university, I always toyed with the idea of running 26.2 miles but after running a race of 10 miles about 20 years ago, I discovered that I didn’t enjoy running after the 8-mile mark. This put running the marathon distance on my “back-burner”, so to speak. There the marathon goal stayed until the idea surfaced about 4 months ago when I began running again for physical conditioning.

After graduate school, I attended medical school and found that I didn’t have much time for running as study was my constant companion.  If I had been wiser, I would have carved out time to keep up with my running, even 30 minutes three to five times per week, thus I would not have gained weight in medical school. My medical school weight followed me through surgery residency and fellowship. I kept promising that I would “get in shape” but never quite put a sound schedule together.

Well, after many years of practice and my sister’s wedding-photos of me were terrible, I decided to revisit getting in good physical condition. Since my weight slowly crept up to the heaviest that I had weighed in my life, I made the decision to lose a few stones so that my knees would hold up in my recreational rugby play. I kept up with my weight-lifting but my cardiovascular work was lacking in a major manner.

In the back of my mind, I knew that my knees would not want me to start out running, thus I began walking at least 30 minutes per session. I used my walking time to meditate (and pray) largely for stress relief. I had found that while lifting weights did relieve some of the stress, I missed running. I decided that I would attempt to get back to the point of being able to run a 10K if the opportunity presented.

Along with my dedicated walking, I changed my diet to no fried food, no candy, no processed food and certainly no “junk food”. My dietary habits were probably the easiest part of my journey because my wise sister had always been a great example for me. She simply doesn’t eat food that her precious body doesn’t deserve. She always said that it was better for her not that eat food that was processed. As I visit her often, I found that her consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables along with lean meats was a good strategy. She is lean, strong and wonderfully alive.

Soon, I found that by eating three nutritious meals with proper portion control, my weight was dropping. As I lost weight, I became faster finally able to jog and then run. Three weeks ago, when I was in beautiful San Francisco, I broke the 20-mile mark running those delightful hills as my training. It also helped that I have a wonderful colleague who was a world-class marathoner, until a devastating knee injury, but still maintains that wonderful thin body build of a marathoner. I envy his metabolism but he’s a great resource.

Today, I am many pounds lighter and running daily runs of 10 miles with great joy. My stress level is zero; my mind calm and at rest, my body continuing to thin out as my distances increase. While I am a bit worried that I won’t be able to finish the 26.2 miles, I keep running and keep running. I set the goal of completing a marathon and I work toward it daily by running, stretching and weight training also with keeping my diet sound. In short, I understand the concept of a “bucket-list” and I hope to mark “completed a marathon” off my bucket-list.

Another benefit of my running and weight loss is that people who haven’t seen me even as short as one month ago, barely recognize me. I have to say that losing enough weight to become unrecognizable is a wonderful benefit of this training. The only downside for me is that since I suffer from a hemolytic anemia (same as my father), I have to keep an eye on my blood counts. So far, even though I can chew red cells on my long slow distances (LSD), I remain asymptomatic. I can also indulge myself with an occasional beer or glass of wine without thinking about calorie counting. I have learned to savor those little treats of Sam Adams or Cakebread Chardonnay, my rewards for training hard.

Setting a long-term goal, working/training for that goal and getting that goal accomplished are items that are very nice for spiritual growth. Stress-reduction is great for intellectual and physical growth. In short, training for this marathon has been a great learning experience for me physically and intellectually. I can’t say  with certainty that I will finish those 26.2 miles but I can say that the journey so far, has been very positive. I am stronger and more resilient in all aspects of my life as my marathon training has spilled over into my academic and clinical practice making me calm, positive and accepting of things as they come, one step at a time. All in all, not bad and quite joyful at times. Bring on those 26.2 miles!

10 April, 2016 Posted by | life in medicine, medical school, practice of medicine, relaxation, stress reduction | , , | 2 Comments